2011-01-24 Heart Benefits for Women Who Cut Hypertension

Researchers Say Study Points Out ‘Missed Opportunities’ to Prevent Heart Disease

http://www.webmd.com/hypertension-high-blood-pressure/news/20110124/heart-benefits-for-women-who-cut-hypertension

Middle-aged women who take steps to lower their blood pressure could reduce their risk of having a stroke, heart attack, or developing heart failure, a new study shows.

Researchers say they found that high systolic pressure -- the blood pressure when the heart contracts -- is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease and its complications in middle-aged and older women.

Doctors say 36% of serious cardiovascular events such as heart attacks and strokes are preventable by lowering blood pressure in women, compared to only 24% in men.

For the study, investigators examined data on 9,357 adults in 11 countries in Europe, Asia, and South America for a median of 11 years. The researchers looked for absolute and relative risks of cardiovascular disease that were associated with systolic blood pressure.

They report that three major risk factors account for 85% of the modifiable risk for heart disease in men and women -- high systolic (the top number) blood pressure, high cholesterol, and smoking. And high systolic pressure is the most important risk factor, according to the researchers. (Read the entire article)

2011-01-25 Lowering BP in Women Reduces Heart Disease Risk

http://www.doctorslounge.com/index.php/news/pb/17306

High systolic blood pressure appears to be a substantial risk factor for cardiovascular events in women middle-aged and older, and many of these events are potentially preventable with lowered blood pressure, according to research published online Jan. 24 in Hypertension.

TUESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- High systolic blood pressure (BP) appears to be a substantial risk factor for cardiovascular events in women middle-aged and older, and many of these events are potentially preventable with lowered BP, according to research published online Jan. 24 in Hypertension.

José Boggia, M.D., of the Universidad de la República in Montevideo, Uruguay, and colleagues measured 24-hour ambulatory BP in 9,357 women and men looking for sex-specific relative and absolute risks associated with BP. (Read the entire article)