2010-04-20 Brain-Training Games Won't Boost Your IQ

The Games May Be Fun, but Study Shows Players' Cognitive Abilities Don't Improve

 

http://www.webmd.com/brain/news/20100420/brain-training-games-wont-boost-your-iq

 

Think brain training will make you smarter? Think again! New research in Nature shows that the brain-training games played by millions of people don't boost IQ.

In the study of more than 11,400 healthy adults, those who played brain-training games did get better at the specific tasks involved in the games, such as solving mathematical problems, but these improvements did not transfer into any other general mental abilities.

"I was surprised to find that millions of people are in involved in these activities, but there was very little solid, peer-reviewed scientific evidence that shows it works," says Adrian M. Owen, PhD, a neuroscientist and assistant director of the Medical Research Council (MRC) Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit in Cambridge, England, in a telephone news conference. "If you are doing it for fun, it's fine, but if you expect improvements in your IQ or general function, our data suggests they will not make you any smarter overall."(Read entire article)

2010-04-20 Study: Brain Games Don't Make You Smarter

http://www.foxnews.com/health/2010/04/20/study-brain-games-dont-make-smarter/

People playing computer games to train their brains might as well be playing Super Mario, new research suggests.

In a six-week study, experts found people who played online games designed to improve their cognitive skills didn't get any smarter.

Researchers recruited participants from viewers of the BBC's science show "Bang Goes the Theory." More than 8,600 people aged 18 to 60 were asked to play online brain games designed by the researchers to improve their memory, reasoning and other skills for at least 10 minutes a day, three times a week.

They were compared to more than 2,700 people who didn't play any brain games, but spent a similar amount of time surfing the Internet and answering general knowledge questions. All participants were given a sort of I.Q. test before and after the experiment. (Read entire article)